UN Pulse from U.N. Dag Hammarskjöld Library: UN-Water Best Practices Awards Open for Applications

un-library:

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The 4th edition of the 'Water for Life' UN-Water Best Practices Award is open for applications, administered by the UN Office to Support the International Decade for Action “Water for Life” 2005-2015/UN-Water Decade Programme on Advocacy and Communication (UNW-DPAC) and the UN World Water…

Go to g.co/indiachallenge to vote for Social Awareness Newer Alternatives (SANA) to win a Global Impact Award.
Project Proposal: integrated water system to support healthy villages
#MakeAnImpact #GoogleImpactChallenge


Social Awareness, Newer Alternatives (SANA)

Project:
Throughout India, villages lack access to clean drinking water and toilets. This spreads deadly diseases and causes unsafe living environments.With a Global Impact Award, SANA will combine solar-powered micro-ionizing water purification and biodigesting technology to improve water and sanitation infrastructure for rural villages. These systems will purify local water sources to provide clean drinking water and the waste water generated will power new community toilets. Over three years, SANA will provide 54 million liters of safe drinking water to residents, providing biodigesting toilets to 10 villages across India, and improved health conditions for 25,000 people annually.

anniekoh:

Nero’s Guests. A eye-opening documentary on the muckraking journalist P. Sainath, who will be on Molokai and Oahu next week for a series of events. The Honolulu events are as follows.

Tuesday, Oct. 1: Church of the Crossroads. 5 pm screening of a performance by The Madras Players of the play WATER! by Komal Swaminathan (trans. S. Shankar). 6:30-7:30: Dinner sourced from local farms. 7:30-8:30: “Whose Water? States, Corporations and Struggles over the Essentials of Life.” Panelists: Charlie Reppun (organic farmer), P. Sainath, S. Shankar (UH-M English Dept.), Kapua Sproat (UH-M Law School)

Wednesday, Oct. 2. Hālau ʻO Haumea, Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies, UH-M. 12-2:30. Luncheon and roundtable. “Environment and Community: Institutional Obligations.” Participants: William Aila (Director of the Hawai‘i Department of Land and Natural Resources); Tom Apple (Chancellor, UH-M); Maenette Benham (Dean, Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, UH-M) ; Malia Chow (Superintendent of National Marine Whale Sanctuary); Brandon Ledward (Director of ‘Aina-based Education at Kamehameha Schools); P. Sainath. Moderator: Walter Ritte (Keawanui Fishpond farmer, community organizer)

Thursday, Oct. 3. UH-M Art Auditorium, 6-9. Center for South Asian Studies (CSAS) Reception followed by evening public lecture by Sainath entitled “When Farmers Die: India, the Agrarian Crisis and the Age of Inequality.” Sainath will address issues affecting agriculture in India ranging from biotechnology to rural poverty.

Friday, Oct. 4. Saunders Hall, Rm 624, UH-M, 2:30-4. Lecture for the Political Science Colloquium Series by Sainath entitled “Media in Contemporary India.” 

P. SAINATH is the recipient of the Ramon Magsaysay Award (often described as Asia’s Nobel Prize) in 2007 and of Amnesty International’s Global Human Rights Journalism Prize in its inaugural year in 2000. His book EVERYBODY LOVES A GOOD DROUGHT is a classic of journalism and has won awards around the world. He has received honorary degrees and lectured at many universities around the world, most recently having taught at Princeton in the Fall 2012 term. His journalism has profoundly affected public policy in India. Sainath has transformed the reporting on the agrarian crisis in India, most especially by writing about neoliberal policies and farmer suicides.

  • chemindefer:

Sealeaf Floating Hydroponic Farm Module
Source: DesignBoom
  • chemindefer:

Sealeaf Floating Hydroponic Farm Module
Source: DesignBoom

chemindefer:

Sealeaf Floating Hydroponic Farm Module

Source: DesignBoom

  • traditional water-carrying jars, buckets and a ring-shaped object supporting head when a woman carrys water jar on her head
  • traditional water-carrying jars, buckets and a ring-shaped object supporting head when a woman carrys water jar on her head
  • traditional water-carrying jars, buckets and a ring-shaped object supporting head when a woman carrys water jar on her head
  • traditional water-carrying jars, buckets and a ring-shaped object supporting head when a woman carrys water jar on her head

traditional water-carrying jars, buckets and a ring-shaped object supporting head when a woman carrys water jar on her head

  • traditional method of collecting rainwater in Jeju Island, South Korea 
  • traditional method of collecting rainwater in Jeju Island, South Korea 

traditional method of collecting rainwater in Jeju Island, South Korea 

  • Carrying water had been an important part of daily lives of most Koreans until the 1970s.
  • Carrying water had been an important part of daily lives of most Koreans until the 1970s.
  • Carrying water had been an important part of daily lives of most Koreans until the 1970s.
  • Carrying water had been an important part of daily lives of most Koreans until the 1970s.

Carrying water had been an important part of daily lives of most Koreans until the 1970s.